Wound Care Clinic FAQs

Here are some frequently asked questions about wound care.

What services are provided at the Wound Care Clinic?FAQ-photo2

What specialists work on the Wound Care team?

Who should make an appointment?

How do I prevent wounds from developing?

What services are provided at the Wound Care Clinic?

Each patient’s evaluation includes an examination by a physician, a medical history review and a comprehensive wound assessment.

A care plan is developed that addresses all the factors that may impede wound healing. Treatment is initially provided on a weekly basis, and may include cleansing of the wound and the use of specialty dressings as well as the use of newly approved technology for wound healing.
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What specialists work on the Wound Care team?

The Wound Care Clinic has a multidisciplinary team of physicians including podiatrists, vascular surgeons, a general surgeon, internists, plastic surgeons, an orthopedic surgeon, emergency medicine physician and an infectious disease specialist. We also have a compassionate and caring staff that includes registered nurses, licensed vocational nurses and medical assistants.

Patients are initially seen each week by a physician. Nurse case managers assess the patient’s functional and nutritional status, and do a wound and pain assessment at each visit. Patients are instructed on wound dressings, protection of the wound area and prevention of further wound development. Physical therapy and home care referrals are also made if needed. The staff works together to provide each patient with the best possible care.

Our physicians:
  • Michael Charney, MD (Infectious Disease)
  • Joan Gates, MD (Emergency Medicine)
  • William Irving, MD (Orthopedic Surgery)
  • Bruce Lerman, DPM (Podiatry)
  • Melody Lynd, M. (Plastic Surgery)
  • Leslie Oldenbrook, DPM (Podiatry)
  • Jude T. Roussere, MD (General Surgery)
  • Peter J. Schubart, MD (Vascular Surgery)
  • Howard Sutkin, MD (Plastic Surgery)

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Who should make an appointment?

If you have had a wound for three to four weeks that doesn’t seem to be healing, is getting worse or is very painful, you should call the Wound Care Clinic for an appointment.  If you are a diabetic or have circulation problems, call as soon as possible.
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How do I prevent wounds from developing?

Education is the key to wound prevention. Patients must know and understand the factors that contribute to the development of chronic wounds. Treating a wound that does not heal is frustrating, time consuming, and expensive. You can enjoy life and prevent wound development by remembering these tips:

  • Inspect and care for your skin daily.
  • Eat a balanced diet. Healthy eating means healthier skin and circulation.
  • Do not smoke.
  • Exercise regularly.
  • If you must remain in bed or are chair bound:
    • Change your position at least every one to two hours.
    • Use a special mattress and seat cushion designed to prevent pressure ulcers.
    • Use pillows to help keep your heels off the bed.
    • Maintain good posture and comfort.
  • If you have problems controlling urine or bowel movements, be sure skin is kept clean and dry at all times.
  • If you are a diabetic:
    • Remember that decreased sensation in your feet can decrease your ability to feel a wound developing.
    • Don’t ignore foot pain; inspect and wash your feet daily.
    • Keep your blood sugar and weight in good control.
    • Trim nails straight across, but not too short.
    • Make sure your shoes fit properly.
    • Avoid walking barefoot.
    • See a podiatrist at least once annually for a check-up.

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